Not the Only One …

Not the Only One …

Thinking about food, that is. The San Francisco Chronicle has been running a whole series called The Faces of Organic — there’s this profile of Jim Cochran, who started Swanton Berry Farm and grows organic strawberries (regular strawberries use approximately one ton of pesticide per acre). There’s a good piece on Earthbound Farms, about which I have such mixed feelings. It’s definitely organic, but also industrial, which I find troubling — the article does a good job parsing the issues. There’s a nice piece on Clover Stornetta — organic milk from non-industrial co-ops is one of my pet issues — Horizon is famous for essentially running standard industrial dairies that differ only in the use of organic feed and lack of antibiotics. Think about it, especially for cream and half-and-half — all the toxins tend to be fat-borne, so this is one of those places where organic would seem to make sense. The series also contained an article on saving money while buying organic, and one on whether organic is actually better for you. There was a nice piece on Sunday called How Michael Pollan Ruined My Life and one today (behind the Times Select firewall, I’m afraid) by Pollan himself indtroducing the series he’s going to be writing for them about industrial versus organic versus local food issues. It made me miss the Union Square Greenmarket, which not only allowe me not to starve to death when I lived on an editorial assistants salary in NYC twenty years ago, but kept me from dropping entirely into despair. Once a week I’d go over and visit the farmers, people who were still connected to something. Saved my life.

Not the only

One thought on “Not the Only One …

  1. Along this theme, there was also an interesting article in yesterday’s salon.com.

    http://www.salon.com/books/int/2006/05/08/singer/

    Also, I came across this book at my local library – very interesting! It’s called “The Self-Sufficient Life and How to Live It: The Complete Back-to-Basics Guide,” by John Seymour. (I believe he has spawned a movement in Britain, and (according to the dust jacket) he has established a School of Self-Sufficiency in Ireland.) It’s an interesting reference and if one could do everything in the book (even down to brewing beer & making wine – chapter 8) one would be totally self-sufficient. I’ll never get there, but as an organizing principle in trying to make everyday decisions (“do I really need this?” “can I make it or should I buy it?,” etc.) and trying generally to head in that direction it’s very thought-provoking and useful. Of course, I imagine it may be easier to be totally self-sufficient in Britain since they have National Health. Sigh.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0789493322/002-5288875-6485656?v=glance&n=283155

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