Knitting as Antidote for Frantic Busy-ness

Knitting as Antidote for Frantic Busy-ness

I’m about to go log in to my job at the Big Corporation, the job that I’m hoping will see me through whatever impending financial doom is rising on the horizon, the job that isn’t my dream job, but which I like nonetheless. As much as I’d love to be able to write full time, it’s good to have a real job, especially for a writer — it keeps me engaged with the world outside my little circle of writers and artists and handymen and hunters and ranchers trying to make a go of it selling milk and eggs and wool. There was a piece in the NY Times a couple of weeks ago about telecommuters fighting off loneliness that I found interesting because it’s not really a problem I run into — for one thing, I’m weirdly happy to spend enormous amounts of time alone, and for another, I work with a group of people spread out between San Jose, Miami, Galway Ireland, Seattle and here in Montana. We’re all so electronically connected to one another at my job, that I don’t really feel like I’m alone all day. Between our group instant messaging program, email, and web-based meetings it’s hard to feel disconnected. In fact, when it gets as busy as it’s been the past few weeks, it’s amazing how fried and frazzled and pecked-at a girl can wind up feeling after another 10 hour day in her own front room.

And so, I’ve taken up my long-neglected knitting project again. Knitting and Netflix — a couple of hours working on the sweater that I’ve knit, pulled out, and knit again so many times now (it’s taken me a long time to figure out how to count stitches and rows, what I really like is knitting the big swatches of body parts, not the v-neck or sleeves where you have to pay attention). After a long day of emails and fires that need to be put out and very long technical documents that need to be edited in too little time there’s something essentially calming about putting in a movie, something that’s going to run continuously for an hour and a half or two hours without the interruption of commercials, and knitting. It gives you something to do with your hands. It keeps a girl from surfing the internet aimlessly. It makes you concentrate a little — not as much as working, but just enough to smooth out those jangly places that are left from the day’s work.

And who knows? This time, I might actually get this sweater finished. Considering it’s been ten below for days now, a nice, warm, raspberry-colored sweater would be a good thing.

3 thoughts on “Knitting as Antidote for Frantic Busy-ness

  1. Now there’s another coincidence! I’ve been so engrossed in knitting a funky scarf that I forgot to stop and now it’s almost long enough to warm everyone in the commune…

  2. This is funny. I’m trying to teach myself to knit, now that I’m not shackled to Big Corporation. But I cannot seem to transition from knit to purl without ending up with extra weird loops all over the place. I really need to find a knitter and fix this, but the baby doesn’t stop running at the park long enough for me to ask the park group knitters what I’m doing wrong. 😀

    My first project is a scarf for the boy, in Harry Potter colors. Eventually, I hope to make him an ammonite:
    http://nautie.blogspot.com/2006/06/intro-nautie.html

    There seems to be an amazing number of really geeky knitters.

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